[That Word This Saturday] Writhe

My word for the day is not such a new word to me. I think I used this word in one of my poems, can’t recall but yeah, the word is not new. Here is the word that my dictionary app (Merriam-Webster) picked for me:

Writhe RYTHE verb. 1 : to move or proceed with twists and turns; 2 : to twist from or as if from pain or struggling; 3 : to suffer keenly

Example:

After falling off the ladder, James lay on the ground writhing in pain.

Further information about the word of the day (source: Merriam-Webster App for iPhone):

“Writhe” wounds its way to English from the Old English verb “wrīthan” (“to twist”) and is akin to Old English verb “wrigian” (“to turn or go”). “Wrigian” gave us the words “wriggle”, “awry”, and “wry”. When something wriggles it twists from side to side with quick movements, like an earth worm. When something goes awry, its twists or winds off course, or toward catastrophe. “Wry” can mean “bent or twisted” but usually implied clever, ironic humor. Nowadays, “writhe” often suggests the physical contortions one makes when enduring crippling pain or when trying to extract oneself from tight grasp (as an animal from a predator’s claws). Alternatively, it can imply an emotionally wrenching feeling (as of grief or fear) from which one seeks relief.

Interesting origin, that’s definitely new. Now that explains that certain feel whenever I use this word, it makes me think nobles, castles, knights and tragedies, heh. Which is why I was able to come up with something like this:

“Alas, that gnawing truth, I lost thee,

all has been for naught.

I clasp thee, writhe in tears,

as I beg the heavens for your breath.”

I knew I should stop reading those tragedies; oh well, I supposed it can’t be helped. And that has been my word for the day.

 

I Listen, You Can Share Your Thoughts With Me